Europe’s GDPR Is Killing Email Marketing, No One is Opening Emails


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This is disturbing for all Email Marketers that are monetizing mostly using Affiliate Marketing.

The main problem issue is that the GDPR requires companies to send emails to people on their mailing list who have never bought anything, asking permission to keep emailing them.

As a result, some email marketers stand to lose 80 percent of their marketing lists — or face huge fines from the EU if they keep trying to email these people without permission.

This is what European Union is saying about:

The objective of this new set of rules is to give citizens back control over of their personal data, and to simplify the regulatory environment for business. The data protection reform is a key enabler of the Digital Single Market which the Commission has prioritised. The reform will allow European citizens and businesses to fully benefit from the digital economy.

Everyone has the right to the protection of personal data.

Therefore, common EU rules have been established to ensure that your personal data enjoys a high standard of protection everywhere in the EU. You have the right to complain and obtain redress if your data is misused anywhere within the EU.1

This is what experts told to CNBC:

“People are not opting back in,” says Michael Horn, the director of data science for digital marketing agency Huge. “It’s one thing for your customers who don’t have a relationship with the brand to decline and not respond, but you’re also losing a sales channel.”

“An email that says ‘privacy policy updates’ is never going to get opened,” says PostUp vice president of marketing and product Keith Sibson. “You never read the terms and conditions when you sign up for some website. It depends a lot on how it’s being presented to the users and how important the sender is making it sound.”

MailChimp estimates about 20 percent of all marketing emails get opened.

The email marketing industry is projected to be worth $22.16 billion worldwide by 2025, according to Transparency Market Research, and approximately 82 percent of companies use email marketing, per marketing research firm Ascend2.

“People are not opting back in,” says Michael Horn, the director of data science for digital marketing agency Huge. “It’s one thing for your customers who don’t have a relationship with the brand to decline and not respond, but you’re also losing a sales channel.”

Internal research from Huge found about 38 percent of Americans are ignoring these emails, and 23 percent have actually used them as an opportunity to unsubscribe. Email marketing firm PostUp has even grimmer stats, estimating that only 25 to 30 percent of recipients globally, and only 15 to 20 percent in the U.S., are opening the emails at all.

Here we found the top 17 questions answered in this video:

Here you can also find 99 Questions & Answers about GDPR

How to solve and avoid getting fined

There are some things that need to be clear and here we quote experts that might explain in few words.

“If someone says “Yes, I agree” or ticks an unchecked box to say “I consent”, they have indicated their consent through an affirmative action. Not only that, but they have done so through an explicit affirmative action – sufficient to satisfy the consent requirements for both ordinary personal data AND sensitive personal data processing.” – Field Fisher law firm

Also you need to let them know what you are going to send over email to get consent:

The GDPR demands that the recipient is provided with adequate information on how their data will be used. For example, if you intend to profile someone’s data to determine what offers they receive, you must now tell your customer that is how you intend to use the data and give them the opportunity to object.
– Tim Roe

Hopefully, this will solve your doubts on how to not get penalties according to this new Privacy law.


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